Home Moving No More Difficult for You Read How

Humans, like plants tend to spread root wherever they stay and shifting to a new place is always a pain. Transplanting oneself and their family and possessions is always a delicate balancing act. There are so many things that have to taken care of and so many things that can go wrong. Read on to find out how you should draft a systematic plan to assist you in moving your home.

Whether you are moving to some place close or to another corner of the world, the basic ground rules still apply.

If you are moving to some place nearby and have a small budget you can carry out your home moving yourself, but if you have to move some place far and have a large number of possessions its best to hire a professional home moving service.

If you are hiring a service, check out their reputation, have your possessions insured and ask for receipts. Cross check the inventory list upon delivery.

If you are going to do your home moving yourself follow these steps:

  • Create an inventory of all items large or small that you are moving, keep it as accurate as possible and make multiple copies of the completed list.
  • Pack all items in cardboard or plastic containers and number or label them. Write the label numbers of the containers along side the item in the inventory list so that you know which containers contain what.
  • Double check to make sure your list is complete and that you have multiple copies, it is preferable to use a computer to create the list.
  • Expensive items like jewelry, watches etc. should be carried in a metal box that you can keep an eye on.
  • Group and keep similar items together.
  • Fragile items should be packed with proper shock absorbing materials. While loading containers with fragile materials make sure they are on top and are secured in place.
  • If needed insure all items, many moving services offer insurance.
  • While renting moving trucks etc. read their contract agreement carefully and clarify any doubts you might have before committing.

 

Devising An Efficient Public Transport System In South Africa

The background for this article was derived from a speech made by Wrenelle Stander (Director General: Department of Transport) to public-transport role players and stakeholders, in 2004. Subsidies, Ms Stander said, “must be viewed within the context of passenger transport funding rather than as an isolated service for poor people. Both needs and funding must be weighed against what is possible”. She conceded that making eventual choices, on this basis, might not be easy.

The status quo

Currently, minibus taxis are the dominant mode of public transport, serving 64% of the 3.8 million workers using public transport. There are, in fact, roughly 9.8 million workers who travel regularly. We can deduce, from these figures, that 6 million workers provide their own transport.

Minibus taxis currently receive no subsidies. Train services are subsidised and are used mainly in metropolitan areas, to serve roughly 24% of public-transport commuters. Subsidised bus transport services 42.5% of the public-transport commuters in rural areas.

74% of the country’s households have no private transport available to them. In rural areas, 62% of the households believe that public transport is either not available, or is
too far away for convenience. Of metropolitan households, 46% are dissatisfied with its proximity.

Public perceptions, though, may not accurately reflect true need and more detail is necessary to providing practical input. The minibus taxi industry, to a large extent, has fulfilled the needs dictated until now, and no vehicle of any sort profits by running half empty. If not even a taxi service exists there may be insufficient call for frequent public transport. A less regular, but committed service, may suit the situation.

Poor service options

Public-transport users are otherwise dissatisfied with the options they have. 48% who use taxis are unhappy with the overall service, as are 42% of the train users and 31% of those who travel by bus.
.
Train dissatisfaction has been voiced, as follows:
· overcrowding, 71%;
· lack of security between home and the stations, 64%;
· lack of security on the trains, 62%, and
· unsatisfactory toilet facilities, lack of punctuality, lack of off-peak frequency and the long distances that commuters must walk between their homes and the stations (over 50%).

Dissatisfaction with bus services were categorised thus:
· a lack of facilities at bus stops (74%);
· passenger overcrowding, 54%, and
· off-peak lack of frequency, 50%.

More than 50% of taxi users were unhappy about high fares, passenger overcrowding and driver behaviour. Other concerns noted were:
· the lack of facilities at taxi ranks, 64%;
· the poor roadworthiness of taxis (59%), and
· the imminent danger of accidents (67%).

No complaints by own-transport users were included, though Minister Trevor Manuel recently made no secret of the fact that traffic congestion was seriously impacting on his ability to get to work at a reasonable hour.

Exercising restraint

Ms Stander made the point that the majority of South Africans do not have regular access to either private or public transport. She used the example of scholars to clarify this:
· scholars number 15.7 million, which means that there are over 60% more travelling regularly to educational facilities than the 9.8 million workers who also travel regularly;
· 12 million (76%) of these walk to school. 75% of these can make the two-way journey, on foot, within one-and-a-half hours, but roughly 550 000 children spend over two hours a day walking;
· 9% of school children use taxis to get to school; another 9% travel in cars, and
· 73% of white children travel to school by car, while only 3% of black children do.

While the intention, here, may have been to infer that white school children have superior facilities at their disposal, the point should, in fairness, be made that, quoting a figure for car usage but none for rail, buses and walking for white children, is misleading. Also, without taking into consideration why children use particular transport modes, a true picture does not emerge.

How far is too far to walk? No one enjoys a long walk with heavy shopping or other parcels, but door-to-door vehicular transportation may cost this nation its health. A half-hour walk, twice a day, for adults, is considered advisable and children should exercise for no less than that – two hour’s of low-impact exercise is not extreme.

During November 2004, news headlines bewailed the fact that in schools where PT and sports are not actively promoted, children are not exercising enough. Walking a reasonable distance is a healthy alternative. It is more important to ensure that those children, who walk long distances, have food in their tummies. The provision of school meals, might offer better options. The pitfall here is to avoid abetting corrupt practices, which may make dealing directly with manufacturers a better option.

Where distances take in excess of forty-five minutes (one-way) to walk, scholars would be better peddling to school than using motorised transport. The manufacture of an initial 550 000 bicycles would provide much-needed jobs, but the recipients would then need income for repairs and maintenance and might need to form cottage industries making postal and grocery deliveries in their areas, to this end.

Safety first

Would scholars be safe riding alone? If not, surely safety is the main reason that people require better public transport? Whether people live rurally or in urban situations; in townships, informal settlements or up-market suburbs; whether they walk during the day or at night, they risk the loss of possessions or their lives.

My teenage, rugby-mad son avoids walking routes and distances, in Durban, that I regularly tackled twice a day in my youth. His need to be fit is more than mine ever was. The difference? Where once it was safe to walk, it is no longer safe even to drive a car, let alone walk. When he was younger and at school in Gauteng, children were not allowed to ride to school on bikes, because too many had been hi-jacked.

Suburban, working parents with cars are more able to choose between schools than rural parents. They easily drop their children off en route to work, without significant detours. Cars that enter the city limits with only one occupant may have left home with up to five – school runs and car clubs have become part of middle-class culture and some families still boast two parents, who may work some distance apart.

But “single occupant cars” are considered “inefficient road users during peak times” whereas those who share vehicles, walk, ‘cycle or use public transport are considered more socially deserving. I don’t quibble with that, but the logic used to come to this conclusion may be incomplete and deserves, I suspect, more consideration.

Few of the 73% of white children transported by car are picked up directly after school. Many join extracurricular activities or childcare groups until their parents’ working day allows them to collect their children on their way home. For many white children, the school day runs from 6:30 until 18:30. Safety is again pertinent; few families still afford full-time assistance and children, returning to empty homes, are vulnerable.

Financial limitations
Preliminary results from the National Household Travel Survey, Ms Stander continued, indicate that: “low household incomes, even in the richer provinces, constrain the affordability of public transport services”.
· Users who do not travel daily, may need to be able to move about in search of work and to shop;
· 5.8 million households (nearly 47%, of which 3.1 million are rurally situated) run on less than R1 000 per month. Financial resources are obviously strained in these circumstances, and
· a further 2.85 million households manage on R500, or less, per month and half of these spend more than R100 of their earnings on public transport.

There are, it seems, 10.7 million workers in the country. 9.8 million workers travel to work regularly, so it must be presumed that 0.9 million workers work out of their homes, live on employer property or work on a contractual basis for short periods.

Of the 9.8 million regular travelers, 32% (roughly one-third) use cars, 39% use public transport and 23% walk. Worker transport, Ms Stander maintained, is then characterised by a mixture of “car dependency, public-transport captivity and walking dependency”. Her choice of words is interesting.

The curse of congestion

A specific problem that faces the viability of future transport systems is growing urban congestion. The number of vehicles that enters cities during working hours must be reduced – funding must be channeled into “public transport and non-motorised transport initiatives”.

Facts that appear to be entirely relevant (and thought-provoking) include:
· the increase of rural to urban migration, over the last ten years, has put undue pressure on suburban, peri-urban and inner-city facilities;
· city populations and industry have decentralised and spread, which makes the provision of efficient public transport a far more complicated issue than it was thirty years ago;
· middle-income families have had to come to terms with high levels of suburban congestion;
· income earners of all levels have had to deal with these issues independently, and
· these trends have undermined the efficiency of cities.

74% of South African households did not have access to a car in 2003 but it is difficult to agree with Ms Stander that the transport needs of middle class, urban, car-owning households were provided for, previously, and still are. Had middle-class, urban needs been adequately addressed, surely those households would never have felt the need to own a car, let alone, in some cases, become two-car families.

The middle classes very often financed their own needs in the past. There was no ultra-cheap housing available in white areas and the authorities would have made short work of tearing down shacks erected on private property – building regulations had to be adhered to. Housing subsidies did not exist, except for parliamentarians who commuted to Cape Town annually and programmes to benefit public servants.

High numbers of inner city and suburban flats were necessary for people who paid far higher rentals than those who lived in townships and subsequently could afford neither their own homes, nor transport. They lived close to schools and their jobs. Only once they could finance private transport, could they, in turn, look for better-paying jobs any distance from home.

Up-grades in living conditions usually resulted once breadwinners had vastly improved their working circumstances. It was not usual, until the ’90s, for young married couples or single people to own property. As a woman, I was granted my first bond by a bank, at the age of 38, despite the fact that I had kept two jobs for most of my adult life and was considered financially stable.

I am not, in any way, trying to suggest that white people did not live considerably easier lives than others. It is though, a fact, that the middle-class suburban areas that ‘mushroomed’, incorporate various facilities that were intended to enable people with various levels of income, to co-exist. The discipline that most facilitated this state of affairs was urban planning.

I totally agree that Apartheid policies brought about inequalities and settlement patterns for which the majority of the population still pays a social price. As Ms Stander stressed, long-distance commuting, for low-income workers, has left a legacy of spatial dislocation:
· poor people travel long distances at high cost;
· their needs have not yet been met;
· many walk in unsafe and unpleasant conditions;
· our high pedestrian death toll must be addressed, and
· a preference to locate to informal housing that is closer to schools and amenities (to reduce long-distance travel) exacerbates already untenable situations.

That Transport expects to turn all these conditions around seems to put illogical strain on the Transport systems. Lack of urban planning is as much responsible and should contribute to the effort by situating industrial and manufacturing opportunities close to low-cost housing estates. Schools and amenities would then also need to be conveniently placed, nearby.

Subsidising the needs

Bearing the legacies of Apartheid in mind, government plans must take into consideration that:
· transport infrastructure implementation should complement existing infrastructure, and use flexible and incremental technologies;
· public-transport subsidies must serve as social investments in support of economic development;
· limited funding is available to reinvest in public transport systems that promise higher costs for people who can little afford them;
· Given the rural and urban needs of a growing economy, reinvestment and the expansion of public transport systems must ensure more efficient and productive settlements, such as safe, off-peak and after-hours public transport to cater for shift workers, working students, scholars, etc., and
· the challenge is to expand social investment to benefit economic development.

During the 2004/05 financial year, subsidies amounted to roughly R4.5-billion. Road-based (mainly bus) subsidies equalled R2.1-billion and commuter rail (addressing the needs of roughly two million, mostly urban, workers with incomes around R2 000 per month) received R2.4-billion. Both must still be considered potential beneficiaries.

Controlling car use in metropolitan areas, promoting public transport in all areas and catering for the safety and infrastructure needs of the 2.26-million workers and the 12-million scholars who walk (half in rural areas) remain important to Transport’s brief.

Any proposals, Ms Stander, explained, will need to take into consideration: that public transport subsidies should enhance the access and mobility needs of all people, where commercial fares for the provision of essential services are unaffordable to its passengers; benefits awarded will need to justify the subsidy costs incurred, and that market failures would result in service providers being unable to provide essential services in a viable manner.

Groundwork approach

How much pertinent information and research was omitted from Ms Stander’s speech, is impossible to estimate, but some situations would have benefited from clarification. It is hoped that proposals will not be accepted before they are explored and discussed at more length and in conjunction with all the others received.

Taxi re-capitalisation will now exchange owners’ vehicles for R50 000. With this subsidy, owners are free to invest in the vehicle of their choice, as long as it follows the legislated, safer specifications. They may also use the money for any other purpose they choose. In sizeable organisations, owners may prefer to develop a different line of business or retire on the proceeds.

When this does happen, it should be noted that those payments will not have subsidised the taxi industry, only the scrap-metal industry. Until the process has been completed, we will have no idea how many of the new taxis will become available to fulfil the country’s needs and how many taxi drivers will still have jobs. This state of limbo may seriously impinge on other decisions.

Worker obligations

Many workers are also obliged to have their cars with them during the working day because their vehicles are part of their gross salary package, used to drive to meetings or make deliveries at the behest of the employer. The public-service subsidized car scheme illustrates: the number of subsidized cars multiplied by four between 1999 and 2002. Officials are expected to use these cars to employer advantage.

Can the government afford to ask its officials to leave their subsidized vehicles at home on a regular basis and can it justify the cost increases over the same period: from R81-million in the 1999-2000 financial year, to R213-million in 2001-02? This increased spend infers the delegation of subsidies to an elite few and possibly causes more disruption in Tshwane (Pretoria) than the taxis that have lately been given specific routes to follow in that city. Other provincial capitals must also be affected, to a lesser degree.

Were the Department to investigate the figures for people who claim their vehicle expenses for business purposes from the South African Revenue Services, it would have a good idea of how many cars must use the city road networks daily and the number of vehicles that must be accommodated daily within proximity of their jobs.

Safe bets

If safe parking facilities could be made available at safe railway stations and safe public-transport ranks, many would consider the options as long as both train- and bus-transport were also safe, affordable and their vehicles were not necessary to their jobs. At the other end of their trip, workers would need to know that they could walk safely from drop-off points to their offices (and back) with brief cases, lap-top computers and other working equipment, even after dark.

Until this is so, punishing car users without improving safety conditions, is a ‘cop-out’. For this reason, Ms Stander’s wording “car dependency, public-transport captivity and walking dependency” might read more honestly: ‘car, public-transport and walking captivity’.

In essence, those who use their own cars are saving the country a fortune in public transport costs; those who use public transport deserve safe and affordable options and those who do walk, should have better conditions in which to do it. All these reflect, to varying degrees, on crime prevention and are not wholly Transport concerns.

None of which offers any solution to the problem of inner-city congestion, but does appeal for a less punitive approach. Our public-transport systems will not be considered efficient until they encourage those who do own cars, to leave them at home. Commuters cannot make this call; it rests, instead, on the ingenuity of Transport, the tax system, urban planning and law-enforcement. It also calls for consultation and co-operation on a far greater level than has yet been implemented.

Non-motorised initiatives

Using Durban as an example: vehicles cannot feed from the inner southern suburbs to the northern ones, without going through the city. Commuters needing to travel to the other side are forced into city congestion, with no options – the M4 stops as one enters on one side and begins again on the other. Providing a viable option to avoid the city would greatly reduce congestion, but would also prove costly; definitely a non-motorised transport initiative, though.

Provision of creatively situated, decentralised taxi ranks and bus termini might also reduce congestion to an enormous extent. Train journeys into the city do not offer a destination close to either shopping, office or beach facilities and secondary public transport becomes necessary.

Bus, rail and taxi services should, perhaps, not duplicate each other, but rather run more efficiently over shorter distances. For instance, if bus services could be initiated on Johannesburg’s ring road, taxis could ferry workers throughout the suburbs – from and to every off- and on-ramp, where bus stops could be situated. Taxi services continually circling on feeder roads next to freeways and across bridges some distance apart, could reduce the need for pedestrians to run across busy traffic lanes.

In many cases, though, the necessary feeder roads still need to be built and, ten years into democracy, the past can no longer take all the blame. When an electricity sub-station in the western suburbs of Johannesburg recently caught alight and left suburbs without electricity for four days, blaming those who laid the original lines sixty years ago, was not constructive.

Sixty years ago, who could have guessed what progress and expansion would occur and how many homes, shops and industries those electricity facilities, would be expected to service? It seems clear that each municipality will need an individual plan to service its immediate industrial, business and shopping areas.

Transport subsidies also cannot be expected to improve the lifestyles of those who live below the breadline, in any noticeable manner. What those people most need, are jobs and increased incomes. Let us deal with the realities, to the very best of our ability.

 

Transportation Safety

Today’s world market is designed in a “I want it and I want it now” environment. There is nothing better than getting your product as soon as possible, but what are the costs of this mode of thinking? All I can say is that it can be very costly in the form of “Monitorial and Human Lives”.

Now this article was not written in order to scare anyone or to change the way products are being shipped. We all know that the products are being shipped for “Supply and Demand” markets and are what helps keep the Economy going in this fast Economy of ours and can be done safely.

What this article is about, you will soon understand as I explain it in the following paragraphs.

As we all know there are many ways the cargo is being transported and they are:

Air, ground and by ships.

There are many safety concerns with shipping by air or by ships, but the dangers that I would like to cover in this article are the safety concerns derived from shipping by Trucks.

A lot of cargo is shipped daily by Trucks of all sizes ranging from the .5 ton PU trucks to the big rigs (18 Wheelers). Many miles are logged on the highways across the United States.

With the amount of traffic on roads today, there is no room for mistakes. One mistake can cause serious damage to equipment, bodily injury or maybe even death to persons involved.

The most danger that I would like to point out today is debris left on the Highways.

The debris ranges from broken glass to rubber tire parts that are thrown from vehicles of all sizes. The most dangerous debris comes from the tires of the 18-wheelers.

Now I am not saying that the debris is only coming from the 18-wheelers, because the fact is that the debris comes for all vehicles traveling the roads everyday.

What I would like for this article to do is to just point out the dangers of debris on the roads and how to avoid damages to your vehicles and from possible bodily injury from hitting the debris and blowing out your tires.

The one thing a motorist can do to prevent injury to themselves and others is to slowdown and make every attempt to not hit debris on the road safely. Look far ahead and always beware of road conditions as possible.

By keeping tire pressures and tread depth at recommended specifications from the manufacturer is one way to ensure a safer trip for everyone.

Remember, all drivers are to take the responsibility for their own vehicle’s mechanical condition, especially the tires.

My name is Sterling Bryant. I am an “Owner Operator” and as a driver, I see a lot of near misses and have seen what can happen when a vehicle hits debris on the road.

 

Vegas Transportation – Your Ideal Guide to Getting Around Vegas Public Transportation Vs Taxis

Commuting in Vegas breaks down to six major options: taxis, limos, trolleys, the C.A.T./Deuce, car rentals, and monorails. People are constantly weighing out their options on how to get around in Las Vegas. Well here I have broken it down for you the most practical uses, for the most popular modes of transportation while visiting Las Vegas. Please allow me to use my pro’s and con’s method of explanation to help you decide what your ideal transportation method will be the next time you decide to visit Las Vegas.

Taxis in Las Vegas will run you up quite a bit if you plan on traveling far and often. The rates in Las Vegas for taxis are as follows; $3.30 to start meter, and roughly $2.20 a mile including gas surcharge, around $1.20 McCarran Airport pick-up fee, and $ 28.00/ hr wait fee. At this point essentially to just leave the airport, and go anywhere within a three mile radius you have already spent almost $20! Also, unlike most metropolitan cities, it is not allowed to hail a cab from the side of the road. Keep this in mind, if deciding to start walking and then not feeling up to it along the way. Cabs are allowed to pick up passengers at all the casinos, and most any business you visit in Las Vegas. Ask for them to call a cab, odds are they will.

The C.A.T. (Citizens Area Transport/ Deuce is Vegas’ idea of public transportation. If visiting from remote parts of the country this might seem like a great feat to you but, in my experience, Vegas public transportation frightens me. It is a bit disorganized in means of arrival times, and the lack of shelter/ protection from the road is very meager. On the bright side, the CAT or the Deuce, one of the two, will always show up. The CAT buses are supposed to run From 3 pm to 11 pm, every 7 minutes. Between 2 am to 5 am, they run every 17 minutes. Please be aware not all CAT bus routes are 24 hours, and the gap for most routes is from 1 am till 5 am. The deuce which runs from downtown all the way back up to Las Vegas outlet stores 24/7, is fairly consistent and probably the best way to visit all major casinos, so long as there is no time crunch, seeing as Vegas traffic is very unpredictable.

 

Alternative Los Angeles Transportation How To Get Around LA Without A Car

If you live in Los Angeles, you know how many cars are on the road. Freeways and surface streets are typically packed with commuters at nearly all hours of the day. Not only does traffic congestion cause many people to waste hours on the road each day, but it also contributes to the pollution and poor air quality that have plagues Los Angeles for decades. High car usage also results in lots of wear and tear on city streets, resulting in potholes and cracked pavement that can damage your car or cause accidents.

You might say, “Sure, I wish I didn’t have to drive my car everywhere, but what else can I do?” Actually, there are many ways to travel around L.A. without the use of a car. With a little advanced planning and a sense of adventure, you’ll find that getting around Los Angeles sans-automobile isn’t as impossible as you thought.

First, there’s the expansive Metro bus system. Buses travel across every part of the Los Angeles metro area and are an affordable way to travel without a car. Traveling by bus has a variety of benefits. Most buses in Los Angeles run on compressed natural gas (CNG), which produces much less pollution than the typical car, truck or SUV. Buses often travel the same distance as cars in less time because of bus-only lanes. Plus, with the price of gas continuing to rise, a one-day bus pass will probably set you back less than the cost of gas for going the same distance in your car.

Depending on where you live, another non-car travel option is the Metro rail system. Using the Red Line, you can go from downtown L.A. to North Hollywood (passing through the famous Hollywood walk of fame area on the way). On the Blue Line, you can travel from Downtown L.A. to South Los Angeles, Anaheim and Long Beach. The Green Line will take you from Norwalk to the South Bay beaches and the newly finished Gold Line travels from Downtown to Pasadena. Traveling by train might take a bit longer than driving your car, but it’s much more relaxing than sitting in traffic and many people enjoy the camaraderie that develops among those who commute every day on the same train.

Another way to get around Los Angeles without a car is bike riding. Many major roads have bike lanes which allow bikers to ride at a safe distance from passing cars. Riding a bike is also a great way to stay in shape and make the most of the beautiful Los Angeles weather. However, you should always take appropriate safety precautions when biking in heavy traffic. Wear a helmet, don’t listen to headphones (that could drown out police/ambulance sirens or a car honking at you) and always bike in the road going in the same direction as traffic. Though drivers are used to sharing the road with bikes, they typically won’t be prepared for a biker going the wrong way in the street or on a sidewalk, especially when they’re making a turn.

Finally, don’t forget nature’s original form of transportation — your feet! Los Angeles is full of neighborhoods that lend themselves to walking. West Hollywood, Hollywood, Santa Monica, Downtown, Silverlake, Studio City and Beverly Hills are just some of the areas where residents can walk to restaurants, shopping, bars and other local businesses. Not only will you burn some extra calories, you’ll have a chance to notice beautiful homes, interesting architecture, neighborhood parks and other things you might have otherwise missed while speeding by in your car.

As you can see, it’s not impossible to get around Los Angeles without a car. Even if you own a car, you can cut down on your fuel costs, reduce traffic-related stress and gain a new perspective on Los Angeles by alternating driving with one of the above transportation methods. Give it a try!

 

High Potential For Transport Recruitment in Employment Market

Neither the job seeker nor the recruiter can ever undermine the high potential for transport recruitment in the employment market. In fact transport field today constitutes one of the most important fields in getting a job. Opportunities are vast and there are multiple sub modules in the field. At the simplest the job might be carrying passengers and transporting freights from place to place. However, this is only one of the numerous jobs available in the transportation field. It could be in land, in the air, or in water course, or in railways or anywhere.

Travel is integral part of life and you can never imagine a life without it. There is high demand for jobs in transport industry and high demand for talents from the entrepreneurs. People are heavily dependent on vehicles for travel whether they are personal or public transport. While high level academic skills may not be required except for the administrative and accounting jobs elating to transport industry, technical excellence is a must. This is the common feature that the transport recruitment has like most other forms of technical recruitment process that includes engineering, construction, aerospace, and oil & gas recruitment.

For instance if you wish to have the core land based job of a vehicle driver or the sophisticated air based vehicle running post of a pilot, you will require technical knowledge and skills in both cases. If you are skilled there may not be difficulty in finding the right job. It however will require knowledge about the right jobs available in the market and at the same time the employers should be aware of your presence in the market. Both these ends require the involvement of a professional and expert recruiting agency that can take care of the process of transport recruitment or other engineering recruitment effectively.

In fact it is such recruiting agency that can select the best suitable candidates for such transport related jobs. With expertise and experience in the field it would be easier for them to carry out the task to the best satisfaction of all and put the right man in right place. So if you wish to choose the job according to your skill as job seeker or find out the truly skilled ones who can carry out your job for you, the recruiting agency is the right choice for transport recruitment.

Not only transport is essential for people in all areas of the society including the travelers, transport job is also most suitable for those who like to travel. There are numerous exciting jobs available on earth, in the sky, or floating on the ocean bed. It is not only the driver’s or the pilot or captain’s job that is available, there are numerous related job from that of the crewmen to airhostess to maintenance engineers. There are even various non-technical jobs like the administrator, manager, or even the security jobs. Transport recruitment is the gateway to a brighter and prospective career for you.

 

Catering to the Needs of the Expatriate Retirees in the Travel Industry

Older travelers, especially the so-called senior citizens, are increasingly finding international travel to be an educational and enjoyable way to spend their retirement years. In addition to these expatriate travelers, according to the U.S. Department of State bulletin Travel Tips For Older Americans, there are more than 3 million Americans who live full time in foreign countries. Combine the expatriate travelers with the expatriate living group and you have a significant population of the U.S. citizenry spending time abroad.

Comparable numbers of citizens from other countries are also living abroad. Some are employees of multinational companies or entrepreneurs who have established a new life abroad. Others are simply enjoying their retirement years through travel while some are exploring possible expatriate living destinations. Many of these are retirees. All are an increasing target market for multiple products and services, especially the travel industry.

There are already frequent senior tour groups that cater to the elderly, primarily smaller groups with a slower pace. They have been very popular and profitable for the travel agencies planning them and most likely will continue to be so as the world population ages. These tours generally provide better travel transportation and hotel accommodations due the special needs of the elderly population.

Creating tours for the senior population who are considering an expatriate living experience is a new niche for the travel industry and one which has a lot of potential. There is an increasing number of American and European retirees looking for a less expensive place in which to retire. They see pre-move exploratory tours as a chance to see firsthand what they will experience on a daily basis if they retire to these destinations.

A travel agency or travel promoter who can provide a tour that gives the prospective expatriate an opportunity to explore different areas of a specific country of interest or briefly visit several countries of interest has a built in market. Couple the travel arrangements with a expatriate living seminar as part of the trip and the possibilities are multiplied several times over.

Cruises are ideal for expatriate living exploration. The fact that the traveler can control his or her own degree of participation and activity while having the opportunity to visit several countries adds to the benefits of such travel. It is easy to include a series of presentations on expatriate living considerations while enroute. Specific information related to retirement in the destination of the day would further enhance the experience.

I have personally been on cruises where topics of special interest to the senior population, like genealogy, have been presented in a series of lectures and discussions. Doing the same by exploring the different aspects of expatriate living in a lecture series could not only draw prospective clients to the cruise but add a new client base to an agency’s bottom line.

 

Everything You Need to Know About Travel Insurance on Your Credit Cards

A GUIDE TO TRAVEL INSURANCE

Whether you’re planning to take your family to meet Cinderella at Disney World, or do so some serious mountain biking with your buddies in the Sierra Madre Mountains, flight cancellations or hospital visits are never on the itinerary. Travel insurance can deliver piece of mind both while enjoying your trip, and if you’re in a seemingly desperate situation. Not all trips are alike, but they may share some familiar headaches:

    • Pre-destination: travel cancellation (e.g. flight, hotel, tours, etc.) due to unforeseen circumstances

 

    • Travel Transportation: missed, canceled or delayed flights; lost, stolen, or delayed baggage; accidents while on common carriers (e.g. planes, trains, busses, boats); rental car damages and disablement (e.g. towing, delivery of gas, etc.)

 

    • Non-medical Issues Abroad: all types of liability (i.e. you damaged something or injured someone); legal costs; hotel burglary; robbery; stolen documents; travel interruption due to unexpected, urgent, or emergency situations

 

  • Medical Issues Abroad: general medical emergencies; sports and leisure injuries; visit to a local doctor; getting prescription medicines; medical transportation or evacuation; dental problems; insect bites etc

Without even knowing it, you may already have some travel protection. This can come from a variety of places. It’s important to read and understand your policies before you travel to make sure you know the extent of your coverage. Print out the details, and take a copy of it with you in your carry-on.

CREDIT CARDS

Not all credit cards offer the same bundle of protection features, but in general there are some similarities between them:

    • No-Fee Credit Cards ($0 per year): Normally you won’t find any travel insurance with these basic cards

 

    • Mid-Range Credit Cards ($1-99 per year): May offer some elements of travel insurance such as flight delays, baggage loss or delay, common carrier accidents, or trip interruption. Sometimes includes basic medical insurance. Certain cards may include car rental insurance (Collision Damage Waiver). None cover travel cancellation or hotel burglary

 

  • Hi-End Credit Cards ($99+): Typically include trip interruption, flight delays, baggage loss or delay, common carrier accidents, travel medical protection, and rental car protection. May offer trip cancellation and hotel burglary

As much as we love to generalize, there is no escaping the fine print. There are certain conditions that apply, especially for medical insurance (e.g. amount covered, length of trip covered, age of traveler, coverage of spouse and children, and exceptions). Some cards include exceptions for rental car insurance in the case of vehicles over a value of $65,000.

CAA (AUTOMOBILE MEMBERSHIP)

The obvious benefit of being a CAA member is the automobile services they offer if traveling by car. In case you purchased your travel tickets through CAA, you automatically receive Travel Trip Insurance ($100,000 maximum for basic CAA members and $500,000 for CAA Plus and Plus RV Coverage members).

There is always the option of purchasing additional insurance outside of your membership fees, which will provide you with an extensive travel protection plan.

VARIOUS MEMBERSHIP CARDS

Look in any direction, and you’re certain to find some kind of club that wants you as a member, be it an airline or a hotel chain. These memberships may come with extra perks like travel insurance. The Hilton Honors program offered by Hilton Hotels for example, provides a Collision Damage Waiver when you rent a car through their partner, Sixt. Or maybe you are already a member?

UMBRELLA PROTECTION

Ever think that an insurance policy could have you covered if you break a whole stand of Swarovski crystals? Think of umbrella insurance as additional liability protection on top of your other insurances. It may protect you against many types of accidents while on vacation such as bodily injury to others as a result of a car or skiing accident, or paying legal expenses for a court abroad. Check to see if you have such coverage, and the extent to which you are protected.

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT HEALTH INSURANCE

As a proud Canadian citizen, you can count on the government to bail you out in an emergency if you’re traveling through Siberia, right? Not so fast. Medical treatment abroad can get very expensive, costing several thousands of dollars. Although your provincial health plan may have you covered when you fall off a ladder in your backyard, it is very limited as soon as you cross the border. Take Ontario and Quebec as examples:

    • Ontario Health Insurance Plan pays up to $200 per day for inpatient general services and up to $400 for such inpatient services as operating room or intensive care

 

  • Regie de l’assurance maladie in Quebec pays up to $100 per day for hospitalization

These amounts clearly are not going to pay thousands of dollars per day that you may be charged in U.S. for staying in a hospital

A SAFE BET

When it comes to visiting the hospital while abroad, make sure stress and regret isn’t what you’ll ultimately be treated for. Without coverage from credit cards and limited protection from the government, you’ll most likely require additional medical protection for you and your family. If you’re anything like us, you’ll probably be doing some rock climbing, downhill skiing, scuba diving or hot air ballooning while on your adventure, which are not necessarily covered. Make sure that your medical coverage does not exclude the activity you plan to be enjoying, whether you’re a professional or just do it for recreation.

For some extra peace of mind, review what you are protected against by your current sources. If there is an important type of coverage that you do not have, strongly consider purchasing a more extensive plan for the duration of the trip. In an unfortunate situation, you’ll know you can keep calm and carry on. Travel insurance is provided today by many insurance companies (e.g. Manulife, Co-operators) and multiple banks in Canada (e.g. TD, RBC), just check their web pages.

OTHER THINGS TO CONSIDER

    • Review your home policy, as some insurance providers require arranged supervision (e.g. checking every 7 days) while you’re away to cover any damages that occurred in your absence (e.g. breakage of plumbing due to freezing)

 

    • Read, understand, photocopy, and carry your insurance policies in your carry-on luggage. Some countries explicitly demand that you demonstrate insurance protection while entering the country

 

    • Some providers may refuse coverage if you are going to “unstable” parts of the world. The list varies from one provider to the next, and changes with time, so explicitly ask if you’re destinations are covered. Some providers use a list from the Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

 

  • Get vaccinated if necessary and talk to your doctor. You will need to start dealing with vaccination 4-8 weeks before departure. To see which vaccinations you may require, check out the web site from the World Health Organization

 

5 Great Tips For Budget Friendly Travel

download (56)Want to travel the world but don’t think your budget allows it? Don’t throw away dreams of vacationing because you don’t think you can afford the adventure. With a little research and planning you can become a budget-savvy traveler. Here are some budget travel tips and handy information for getting around the globe on as little cash as possible.

1) Airfare – To save on airfare your best bet is to plan ahead. Advance tickets can be bought at a huge discount, while waiting to purchase airline tickets until right before your flight will cost a fortune. Also, if you are buying tickets online you can often lock in prices and receive money back if the ticket prices drop. You can also frequently find great deals online or get promotional codes for even greater discounts.

2) Transportation – When traveling, transportation costs can really add up. Always try to avoid taxis when possible. Taxis are highly convenient but the prices are high and there are usually more budget friendly alternatives available. Public transportation is not only a great way to save money but it can provide an excellent way to experience new places. Walking when possible is your best budget-friendly way to travel. It is a fantastic way to sight see and it is completely free.

3) Meals – Eating while on vacation can really start adding up if you are not careful. Try and plan your meals in advance whenever possible. Then you can control the cost of the restaurants you visit and not end up shocked when the bill comes after a meal. If you do plan on dining out for your meals try and eat a bigger lunch and go easy at dinner time. Lunches at restaurants are often a lot more budget friendly then dinners so it will really cut down on the costs of dining out. Shopping locally and preparing your own meals is also a viable alternative that can be an entertaining option that will really save money.

4) Lodging – Accommodations during your vacation will probably one of the biggest expenses. Plan ahead and reserve rooms in advance when possible so you can research the best deals and prices within your budget. You can often save money when shopping online by purchasing airfare, transportation and lodging in a travel package. Your options may be limited when you order a travel package but prices are often greatly discounted. Looking for accommodations that are a little out of the way of tourist attractions can often net you huge discounts as well. Just take into account the fact that your travel will be greater and possibly more costly.

5) Free Activities – Not everything on your trip has to cost money. Most places you visit will have tourist traps that are expensive and not all they are cracked up to be. Talk to locals and see what they love to do. Some may even volunteer to show you around. Check out all of the local sites that are admission free. Places like gardens, museums, historical sites and parks are often free and will offer you a great glimpse of culture wherever you are visiting.

As you can see, with a little wise planning and flexibility your next vacation doesn’t have to break the bank. Traveling can be within your reach if you just follow these simple tips and rethink your vacation as a budget-savvy traveler. So what are you waiting for? Start planning your next adventure today.

 

Transportation For Your Italy Vacation

download (55)When most people travel, transportation is a primary concern. How do you get from the airport to your hotel? How do you see all the sights that the destination has to offer? What if you are traveling in a large group? What about public transportation? If you are traveling to or through Italy, there are several options for transportation.

Many international flights arrive in Rome, so in planning your transportation needs you need to start from there. When you arrive at the airport, you can rent a car from one of the several car rental companies. In addition to local companies, there are the international names such as Hertz and Enterprise, so you should be able to reserve your vehicle online in advance and have it waiting for you at the airport.

There are 2 airports in Rome – Fiumicino and Ciampino airport. Buses and shuttles depart from the airport arrival area about every hour and can take you to the Termini Station which is the central train station. From there you should be able to connect to all other parts of Italy. Public transportation, although it requires some advance planning, is always the cheapest option for your Italy vacation. You may also want to learn some Italian words in case you get lost and need directions or need some help.

If your hotel is near the airport or is in Rome, you may also consider taking a cab. They are known as “taxis,” and most drivers speak English and can even serve as your tour guide if you choose. You may take a taxi out of Rome if your Italian vacation is starting outside the city. If your budget allows, there are limo services at the airports that can serve your transportation needs when you arrive. If you are traveling in a large group, you probably want to rent a van (at least to get to your hotel from the airport). After that, you can plan to join a guided tour as a group, but its best to reserve tickets or space in advance if you want your group to stay together.

To see all the sights that Italy has to offer, you will do best by signing up for a guided tour. With very knowledgeable and friendly tour guides, your Italian vacation can be greatly enhanced by choosing this option. There are walking tours, full day tours, night tours, budget tours and luxury tours. If you are in Italy for a very specific sight, you would probably want to do a walking tour. The tour guides on those tours give a more detailed presentation as you walk through the sight and some of them know little-known facts that are hard to find or read anywhere else. Most tour guides speak English, but you want to be sure before signing up.

No matter where you go in Italy, transportation is key to getting you to and from your destination. Choosing the right one for your Italian vacation should a top priority when planning your trip.